PROJECTS

IC PROJECTS COMPLETED

A subscriber line interface circuit was designed in a high voltage bipolar process. The circuit is capable of transmitting and receiving voice over unshielded twisted pair for a wide range of distances.

A 20 sq mm IC was completed in a high voltage CMOS process. The circuit entailed one 1-amp switch, one 0.5-amp switch and 7 200-mamp high side switches. The circuit entailed a quiet charge pump for the high side switches, input logic decoder, two regulated output power supplies, and drivers with slew rate control for all of the switches. The circuit also included numerous self-diagnostics, communicated through the digital bus.

A 10 sq mm IC was completed in a bipolar process. The IC was capable of delivering 2 amps at 5 volts and 1 amp at –5 volts.

A high noise immunity timing circuit was designed on a bipolar array. The circuit generates “one shot” and the circuit can swing to over 10 volts below the power supplies.

A high-speed 6-bit analog to digital converter is designed in a bipolar process. The circuit samples an analog signal and outputs 6 parallel bits as well as a 7th bit for stacking the converter to higher bits.

A very low power (microwatts) circuit was designed to sense magnetic fields. The circuit employed a sigma delta converter, and was fabricated in a 0.5um CMOS process.

An 81 sq. mm. IC was completed in the Agere CBIC-R 33 volt process. The IC is capable of driving four loads at +/-0.5 amps of current each.

The output currents are controlled using four 8-bit DACs. All the logic for the IC is designed in ECL.

A CMOS IC was completed in the Elmos 0.8 mm process for controlling the biasing current of lasers and detecting optical pulses received through a photo diode. The driver is capable of biasing lasers up to 150 mA (adjusted through an external resistor) and can bias the lasers ON, in less than 1 msec, with virtually no overshoot.

A mixed-signal linear array (MSA) was developed in the Northrop Grumman BiCMOS MEEKS process. Unique to the design is it's flexibility in providing a wide range of ICs from 2.25 sq mm to 225 sq mm. Components of the array include 2mm CMOS, 2 GHz, 10 volt npn and pnp bipolar transistors capable of up 100 mA, 2 values of sheet resistance, trimable NiCr resistors, NiCr capacitors and non-volatile memory. The NiCr resistors and capacitors are fabricated during the personalization of the array.

An IC was designed in the Northrop Grumman mixed-signal linear array, described above, that contains 12 relay drivers, 2 laser current modulators, 2 magnetic switch drivers, 4 MUXED 8-bit A/D converters, as wells as +5 and -5 volt 100 mA regulators and decoding CMOS circuitry.

Two linear regulators +5 volts (2 amps) and -5.6 volts (1 amp) were designed in the Lucent Technologies CBIC-V2 process.

A high speed npn comparator was designed in the Lucent Technologies CBIC-V2 process. The comparator achieves very high input impedance using a differential JFET input, and has a common mode range in excess of 10 volts.

Also, a high speed gain control amplifier was designed in the Lucent Technologies CBIC-U2 process. The amplifier exhibits low input noise and has an input offset of less than 1 mV.

A Lucent technologies CBIC-R IC was developed to control the output power of four lasers simultaneously, using feedback loops that sense the output power of the lasers.

A 100-volt blocking and 300 mA ON PIN diode switch with very fast turn-on times (< 1 ns) was designed in the Lucent Technologies BCDMOS process.

A dual MOSFET driver was designed in the Lucent Technologies CBIC-U2 process. The driver has two 1-amp drivers and two 0.5-amp drivers. The drivers are configured for break before make, with switching delays of less than 10 nsec.

A 110-volt varactor controller was designed in the Lucent Technologies CBIC-S process.

Also a 75-Ohm cable driver was designed in the Lucent Technologies CBIC-V2 process. The cable driver has 4-bits of digital controlled gain, with a range of 0 to 30dB programmable in steps of 2 dB. The amplifier input noise level is 88 dBmV/sq. rt. Hz, and the total harmonic distortion is less than 60 dB at 43 MHz with +/- 1 volt of output drive into 75 Ohms.

A tri-state pin driver for automatic test equipment was designed in the Lucent Technologies CBIC-U2 process. The driver can slew 2000 volt/msec into 1 meter of 50-Ohm coaxial cable over the range of -2.5 volts to 7 volts. The upper and lower pulse limits are adjustable to within 1 mV. In the tri-state mode, the loading capacitance of the driver is less than 2 pF.

A two-chip set was designed in the Lucent Technologies CBIC-R process to receive tones up to 44 kHz from photo diode currents as low as 10 nA. The chip set provided up to 90 dB of gain, and band pass bi-quad filtering with 40 dB/octave of frequency roll-off. The chip set contained, a transimpedance amplifier, a gain equalizer, 7 OpAmps for the BI-quad filtering, an absolute value detector, and a comparator.

A dual OpAmp was designed in the Lucent Technologies CBIC-U2 process. The dual OpAmp can drive over 10k meters of unshielded twisted pairs (UTP) cabling. The OpAmps have a unity gain bandwidth of over 200 MHz. (the amplifier is not unity gain stable), with 60 dB of dc gain. The OpAmp can drive 150 mA, with a voltage swing of 6 volts peak to peak (with +/-6 volt supplies) and slew 500 V/ms.

A quad 40 mA current driver IC was designed in the Lucent Technologies CBIC-R process. The ASIC accepts the four bytes for the four 8-bit DACs in an ECL serial buffer, and latches the four current outputs with an enable pin.

An 84-volt line current driver was designed in the Lucent Technologies CBIC-S process.







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Site last updated Feb 6, 2013